The Coastal Star

Collapsed foliage in a Highland Beach yard. Photo provided

Collapsed foliage in a Highland Beach yard. Photo provided

A palm tree fell into the Intracoastal Waterway in Highland Beach. Photo by Peggy Gossett-Seidman

Palms swayed in the wind Saturday as Hurricane Irma approached Boynton Beach. Here's a view looking east across the Intracoastal Waterway from Harry Woodworth's backyard during one of the gusts. "Many times we could not see even the two boats less than 250 feet away!" Woodworth said. Photo by Harry Woodworth

Damage at Boca Pointe Country Club in Boca Raton following Hurricane Irma. Photo by Stacey Vogel

The beach in Highland Beach is littered following Hurricane Irma. Photo by Rachel Prince

Residents wait as police check IDs at the Highland Beach border following Hurricane Irma. Photo by Rachel Prince

The Publix at Linton Blvd. and Federal Hwy. has roped off their freezer section following Hurricane Irma. Photo by Rachel Prince

Highland Beach palms along A1A were stripped of fronds as Delray Beach Fire Department checks condos on Tuesday. Photo by Peggy Gossett-Seidman

Tree damage at Veterans Park in Delray Beach. Photo by Rachel Prince

Veterans Park in Delray Beach following the storm. Photo by Rachel Prince

Damage to an awning on a house along the Intracoastal Waterway between Delray Beach and Highland beach was caused by Hurricane Irma's winds. Photo by Rachel Prince

A sheet of metal roofing is torn from the porch of a house along the Intracoastal Waterway between Highland Beach and Delray Beach. Photo by Rachel Prince

A palm tree falls near a boat along the Intracoastal Waterway between Delray Beach and Highland Beach. Photo by Rachel Prince

A palm approximately 25-feet tall fell in Mike Smollon's backyard in the County Pocket. He spent the storm hours in Palm Beach Gardens. He didn't know the type of palm and said, "I grew that from a seed that I brought from Arizona over 15 years ago." Photo by Mike Smollon

Abbey Delray senior living community welcomed residents from sister community, Harbour’s Edge during Hurricane Irma. While Abbey Delray didn’t receive any serious damage there was some down tree limbs and debris scattered in the area. Tommy Schuster, a team member from Friendship Village of South Hills, a sister community located in Upper St. Clair, PA., volunteered to assist the hurricane relief efforts. He’s pictured here clearing debris and assisting the team with whatever they needed. Photo provided

A fence is blown down by Hurricane Irma at Sacred Heart Catholic School in Lake Worth. Photo by Milka Santos

A fence is blown down by Hurricane Irma at Sacred Heart Catholic School in Lake Worth. Photo by Milka Santos

The children's garden received damage at Sacred Heart Catholic School in Lake Worth. Photo by Milka Santos

Sacred Heart School sustains damage from Hurricane Irma. Work crews are working to repair damage.

"I am heart broken at the damage we have sustained. We have roof damage and water leaks in classrooms, our fencing is down, and our screened in porch is missing a few walls. Sadly, our children's garden has been destroyed. I pray that our children and their family are safe." Principal Candace Tamposi
The school is waiting to have power restored soon and hope to be back to teaching their scholars by Monday, Sept. 18.

A large ficus tree falls during Hurricane Irma in Boynton Beach. Photo by Troy Giddens

In the neighborhood by forest park elementary grew old Banyan trees. Growing up in Boynton Beach such a tree was my favorite to play in. My friends and I would climb these majestic almost nurturing beings that offered us hours of fun and refuge. As the years and hurricanes have passed I watched these wonders of nature stand fast against the torrential winds and rain until they could stand no more. I'm guessing the old trees became weakened by the years. I mean they had to of been 100 years old or more! This year during hurricane Irma we lost another Majestic giant who lived on 12th and 2nd. Farwell gentle giant,farwell.

— Troy Giddens

These brave linemen from Toronto, Ontario, Canada, drove 1,500 miles in 17 trucks into the storm to restore our electric in Highland Beach. In one day, the 23 guys put an end to our week-long misery of no electric in 91-degree stifling sun. Never mind they are suffering in heavy safety gear in this heat while accustomed to temps in the 30s and 40s Fahrenheit! They slept in their trucks due to no hotels, and also rescued us in Wilma. As always, the friendly and mellow Canadians from Durham High Voltage and owner Steve Dewell never complained. Residents delivered dozens of donuts, sandwiches and cookies to the workmen during their job. Photo by Peggy Gossett-Seidman

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